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more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&p says recent policies could reflat japan's economy. but the government's books will continue to be weighed down by heavy debt. that's even if plans go ahead to raise a sales tax. there's a one in three chance of a downgrade this fiscal year. this is as the japanese prime minister shinzo abe says he will consider changing the bank's mandate. he didn't comment on current policy. all this as investors determine who will become the bank of japan's next governor. front runners for the post include former bank of japan deputy governor and the head of the asian development bank harikahiko tura. >> we did catch up with taro at a meeting this weekend in moscow. the next boj governor was covered, but the first question, whether mr. aso thought the g-20 communique was an endorsement of japan's domestic stimulus plan. >> japan has repeatedly tried to explain that japanese policies are taken to overcome deflation and by all means, these are measures to overcome deflation as well as the recession. that's what is being said in the second paragraph o
the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next, on booktv. this is a little over an ba okay. it is great tock be back at the society. >> for 25 years now, we enjoy a terrific relationship with the a japan society in so manyys wayse ved quudible] bed we have lived quite a bit o time in this is great to be with you let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when
diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial charges facing the economies of europe, japan, china and south korea. next on booktv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it's great to be back at the japan society, and we enjoy our relationship that way. tokyo, for the mcgraw-hill companies, has been the headquarters of our asia pacific operations for 25 years now, and we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot concern in a lot of different ways. one of many by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to m
members urged caution in withdrawing stimulus to the economy prematurely. the fed policy board is expected to examine the effectiveness of its asset purchasing program more closely after its next meeting in march. housing construction is a key indicator of the health of u.s. economy. the number of permits for new construction rose for a third straight month. this suggested recovery in the housing market remains on track. department of commerce officials say housing starts last month came to 890,000 units. that's a decline of 8.5% from december. construction of condos and other multifamily tumbled 26%. the drop was enough to offset a rise. housing permits rose 1.8% from december. that's the highest level since june 2008 before the start of the global financial crisis. let's get a check on tokyo markets. first taking a look at stocks. market sentiment is damaged. the nikkei is trading at 11,423. sources say investors are selling export related issues to take profits after recent gains. moving onto currencies now. the fed minute that hint at scaling back monetary easing has led to dollar buyi
and dedication have not yet been rewarded. our economy is adding jobs -- but too many people still can't find full-time employment. corporate profits have rocketed to all-time highs -- but for more than a decade, wages and incomes have barely budged. task,our generation's then, to reignite the true engine of america's economic growth -- a rising, thriving middle class. [laughter] --[applause] it is our unfinished task to restore the basic bargain that built this country -- the idea that if you work hard and meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead, no matter where you come from, what you look like, or who you love. it is our unfinished task to make sure that this government works on behalf of the many, and not just the few, that it encourages free enterprise, rewards individual initiative, and opens the doors of opportunity to every child across this great nation. [applause] the american people don't expect government to solve every problem. they don't expect those of us in this chamber to agree on every issue. but they do expect us to put the nation's interests before party. [applause]
in the local economy by my parts. every person who works on my product is going to raise the price of my product. every hand that touches the unit that i sell, a certain percentage of the company buys this products. every time i go to a vendor to get a part, my costs will increase. my competitor build a similar part for almost a third of what i build a mine. you will take away the factory workers who manufacture my parts. this is all usa jobs. lower the price of gas. back to two bucks a gallon and you won't have to worry about the minimum wage. host: how would an economist pre-minimum wage respond to that caller? guest: you are raising the cost of that worker to that business. that worker will have more money to spend. you can make more profits. you can pass the cost to people who are buying your goods by raising prices. raising the minimum wage has an effect on the economy. the question -- if there is a chance it would raise unemployment or perhaps put a business in the red. host: michelle, tacoma, washington. caller: i just realized our state is one of the higher states with minimum w
about. number one, is it because the economy is better or are they worried about creating an effect. the other thing is, were they trying to make credit so available that they risk ed -- remember they said that yesterday. they were trying to move it out the curve. >> and they were trying to -- >> but then people like santelli would say it they didn't realize what the possible outcome could be. >> ahead of this appearance, i would like to think about the downplays a minute. >> right. and in this latest fed, which is very transparent, a lot of times they've made some moves like this that are talked about and conjectured and all of a sudden they're available to come on. >> i bet he's one of the guys in the room who was making a big stink about where things are headed. >> the other thing that i wonder, given that everybody knows -- >> i think he's been concerned for a while. >> but given that there are minutes and everyone knows there are minutes being taken, i think if you are a hawk in all this, you show up in the meeting and you are as loud and as prod as humanly possible to get your
state of the union address, our top priority should be doing everything we can to grow the economy and create good jobs. that is our top priority and it drives every decision we make and it has to drive the decisions that congress and everybody in washington makes over the next several years. that is why it is so troubling that 10 days from now congress might allow a series of automatic, severe budget cuts to take place that will do the exact opposite. it will not help the economy. it will not create jobs. it will visit hardship on a lot of people. here is what is at stake. over the last few years, both parties have worked together to reduce our deficit i more than $2.5 trillion. more than two thirds of that was through some really tough spending cuts. the rest of it was through raising taxes, tax rates on the wealthiest 1% of americans. together, when you take the spending cuts and increased tax rates on the top 1%, it puts us halfway to the goal of four dollars trillion -- $4 trillion in deficit reduction. thomas say we needed to stabilize finances. -- economists say we need it.
a question on everyone's mind -- how do we get the economy to grow from here? no one knows better than the leaders of corporate america. joining on set this morning, 32 adviser ceo robert wolfe. we'll have hanes celestial ceo irwin simon. and the kraft group president, jonathan kraft. >>> on the lighter side of things, spring is around the corner. that must meantime for baseball. white sox vice president ken williams will join us to talk business on and off the diamond coming up at 8:40 eastern time. >>> an interesting mix of topics in rotation today. first, let's get over to andrew with the top headlines. >> thanks. >>> boeing reportedly found a way to fix battery problems with its grounded 787. here's what's happening. involves increasing the space between cells in the battery. a source tells reuters the gaps between the cells were why there was overheating. we'll talk about that in a bit. >>> in other news on boeing, the company's engineers are split on a contract. the largest professional group approved the planemaker's latest contract offer. but members of a smaller technical unio
first step toward getting federal spending under control in a way that would ultimately help the economy. >> let we get back to my first, if sequestration isn't, maybe we'd get as many as we might have if we spent money and if we're at the status quo. >> they're talking as far as jobs are concerned and the larger economy. if the government spends less in the larger economy, then it would cost some jobs overall. as far as the-- >> meaning slow growth, rather than cost jobs. >> exactly. as far as the military is concerned, there's a lot of controversy about this. you have a lot of republicans who are against sequestration, solely on the grounds of cuts to the federal government, excuse me to the defense department and you've heard today, leon panetta talking about hundreds of thousands of workers who will be furloughed and talked about damage to combat readiness and say there's an omb report, management and budget which says that they believe that the secretary of defense, and the president, do have the discretion to move money around so that combat readiness would not be affected by these
'll be on the ground in milan with the latest. we'll get a view about how the country's economy could be transformed as an exclusive interview. we're hours away from retail giant walmart's earnings. we'll hear what investors expect head of the company's reporting results in light of a weak start to february. >>> and shareholders vote on rothschild about replacing the board. we'll also get a preview of this likely ending of this battle of the titans. >>> and japanese prime minister shinzo abe is heading to walk to talk to president obama. just what kind of reaction can abe expect from washington? we'll give you a preview. >>> before all that, let's recap what's happening in markets. we've seen more activity, in fact, higher volume over the last couple of sessions, really, than we've seen for much of the year. the volume is coming on a sell-off. u.s. markets fell yesterday following the release of the fed minutes. it was the worst day of the year for the s&p and nasdaq. as you can see, shedding 108 points there, a rare triple digit decline this year. energy and material stocks were the worst hit. all
of real threats to our security and our economy." the push for cyber security coincides with a report from computer security firm mandiant saying it exposed china's military directing cyber espionage of u.s. companies. the report said the chinese stole technology blueprints, proprietary manufacturing processes, partnership agreements, contact lists and more. "businesses need to be both aware of cyber security problems and to be proactive in adopting best practices to protect themselves and our economy." "their designs are taken. they may find them sold to chinese companies who eat into the market share of that company. overall, the u.s. economy can be hurt." the response from the white house: a series of executive orders to pursue, prosecute and punish the offenders, and a call for the private sector to share information - that last point a difficult one for companies trying to keep competitive advantage over one another. "they could be sued by business partners, employees and others if their proprietary information is shared under the guise of solving cyber security problems." some think
be with regard to the economy and not both sides being able to go back to constituencies and say truthfully here's where i stood and it happened nevertheless. it benefits the republicans because their mantra is one of we are not going along with spending cuts without tax increases and we can't have tax increases on top of the 600 billion we went along with. the president made a pitch to independence by saying the word compromise. i'm for doing this in a manner that compromises. i think it's going to happen a week from friday without a vote and that is also to the benefit of the members because they won't be held accountable for it. >> is this the new normal that we came to expect? >> yes. >> how washington works and is it how our founding fathers designed our system to work? isn't there a catch 22 here as we beat congress over this and isn't this the way we were designed to work? >> i can't go that far back in history, but in modern times and the time i have been paying attention which is three decades, i don't think the polarization has been anything like it is today. this entire situation is r
, ignores an economy that is struggling, remember, it contracted in the last quarter, and it's projected to contract some more in the first and second quarter, ignored 23 million people who are out of work, ignored the fact that unemployment rates are going to go up. ignored 86 trillion dollars in unfunded liabilities. i'm embarrassed about that because the people in office that could do something about it are not doing anything about it. >> herman cain. >> and don't attack rush limbaugh-- >> herman cain you're a successful businessman and you've just made a bottom line argument that i love. if you look back at the last quarter of last year, what do you see? the defense department pulled spending and what happens? the gdp, the economy slows down. now we're approaching a sequester and pull money helter skelter from every skek tore, what do you think it's going to do to our economy. >> juan, you're wrong. >> it's going to hurt america. >> juan, you're dead wrong. those weren't the factors that caused the economy to contract. >> that's what the economy said, herman. >> those are the wrong e
now, a tremor will hit the american economy that is both unwelcome and unnecessary. it is an across-the-board cut in spending that, according to some estimates, will cost us 750,000 american jobs. as we will hear today, there are some estimates that that is too conservative. if one takes into account the ripple effects of the tremor, it may cost us many more jobs than that, but even by the most conservative estimates, 750,000 americans who worked in contract in firms, research companies, universities, hospitals, child care centers, schools, businesses small and large around the country, and who work for the government itself, will find themselves and their country at risk. this does not need to happen. led by my friend and colleague from whom we will hear in a little while about the specifics, we put forward a constructive, common-since alternative to avoid these 750,000 layoffs. the alternative, frankly, involves closing tax loopholes that the wealthiest among us can exploit and take advantage of, and stopping mindless subsidies to huge oil companies and agribusinesses. it makes se
, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example, after balance those things. this university has been educating and training people to understand that balance since its very beginning. i spoke this morning with a whole group of very talented young rotc students, many who are getting ready to graduate in commission on the three programs operating on the status. -- on this campus. the university has put 1079 people into the peace corps in its 51 year history. numerous people over the course of the university history have gone to work in the state department's. then we can go broader, teach for america, or the students who have trained over generations to get jag program degrees, military law degrees here. this university is so committed to that global role that we are supposed to play as citizens and to keeping those balances of strength and balance. there's really no one today on this stage in our country where exemplifies keeping those invalid better than our speaker. we're so glad to welcome here to the ground and to the commonwealth. please give a warm welcome to secretary john
that will spur a new american economy that is focused again on making and innovating and growing and manufacturing and exporting. the long-term security and absolutely dependent on managing these risks we have identified today. it is that important for this country. you all can help. one man who understands this better than most is tom daschle. i can say a lot of things about tom daschle. i can talk about his military career in the air force. i can talk about his service in the house of representatives and his extraordinary leadership in the senate. the only person to serve as a majority and minority leader. i have said a lot about this man in terms of what his counterparts thought of him. i prefer to talk about tom daschle the father and grandfather. i think you can tell the measure of a man or a woman by the children. tom has got three great kids. i had the pleasure of knowing all of them. his daughter is an award- winning journalist. his son nathan is a social entrepreneur. his daughter lindsay, my favorite -- he cannot say that -- works at usda. she did an extraordinary job o
the u.s. economy will grow slowly this year as tax increases and spending cuts offset improvements in the private sector. bruce willis is "a good day to die hard" pulled in $25 million. "identity thief" rant and with a close second, 23.4 million. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ dagen: $101.7 billion over the next ten years. the joint committee think this is the cost of a massive new sales tax to pay for obamacare. elizabeth macdonald is here with the bottom line. explain how this is, ultimately, being passed on. >> it is an excise tax or sales tax. look at this number. $7200. health insurers will pass this on. look at this. joint committee and taxation think that health insurers will pass this on. expect it to hit the insurance, basically, consumer in the form of higher premiums. they estimate 2.5% greater cost. we have two congressmen looking
that affected agriculture this year. despite the drought, i think the aggie economy -- ag economy is very strong. far income, near record highs. a record high for 2012, and four 2000 13, projected cash income close to record highs. -- and for 2013, projected cash income close to record highs. low debt to asset ratio. assets at record highs. however, i think the aggregate measures belies some sharp differences between sect hers. -- sectors. despite the adverse weather, producers have fared well, with high prices and record crop insurance indemnity's, which helped offset the losses we saw this year. if you are in uninsured or underinsured former, -- farmer, crop losses are hitting those producers a little more than those who have insurance. and if you are a livestock, dairy, and poultry producer, this is the third year since 2007 when we have seen record high prices, with the effects that has on higher feed costs, tight margins. and we have seen, particularly on the capital side, some liquidation. -- the cattle side, some liquidation. 2013, we were expecting a rebound in yields. we should
, patriotic smugglers during the colonial war during this time in this country there are existing economies between good and bad. it was alluded to a moment ago by pat in her comments a moment ago. it feigns dynamism. it reminds you that what is forgotten now may not always be so. the impermanence of what is forgotten. it is an antidote to naturalizing things. how things are, how they will be, and how they should be. how the book challenges us, well, we have many episodes of demonization and also what we might call dehumanization or purification. these are very telling because it sheds a light on who gets to define what is permitted and what is not. based on the power to define what is legal and what is not. in the book it talks about before the revolution and in the late 19th and early 20th century, we saw the purity crusader, his name was anthony. he was responsible for being against illicit images and condoms being illegal. this is all forms of contraception including commons are legal. including the issuance of condoms for u.s. soldiers and etc. i will deconstruct the incompletion voyeu
there are more significant. we need a transition to -- there are major economies going and the direction of low carbon. we are pushing the us to go in that direction. there is opportunity for canada to diversify its economy and become low carbon. and europe, they're looking at a directive. there is an opportunity i think to view the developments. is this a momentous change that we are looking at to start driving this? what does that mean for that relationship? i think the economic growth and the job opportunities are much bigger and greater than where we would find the fossil fuels sector. >> rupert murdoch, the guy who owns fox news and the wall street journal, he tweeted against of a keystone and said that we do not need. we have cleaner, natural gas from phrack inc.. -- fracking. what is the implication of this domestic boom? what crowd out the need for energy from canada? what does it mean that the u.s. is talking about being energy independent? >> it was separated into two areas. natural gas and homes. we are looking at surpluses. to say whether it will crowd canadian gas out of the u.s. m
to our national security as well as to our farm economy. whether we are talking food or water or energy security, let me put it this way -- in the future, more crops in the field can mean fewer soldiers in the field. at the same time, as important as our defense capabilities are, we also need to rebalance toward the other three d's. the u.s. today spends more on defense than on diplomacy, democracy, and development all put together. meanwhile, in the past year china has more than doubled its investment in developing new agricultural technologies. those are the kinds of farsighted policies that are enabling china to emerge as a world power and which we, frankly, need to get back to. as we shift our focus and our resources toward smarter, more constructive forms of international interaction, it is critical that food security remain at the center of shaping this secure world. when it comes to diplomacy, that means working stronger public- private and government-to government relationships, like u.s. ais promising initiatives, initiatives like feed the future being country that a lead and f
is hurting our economy and what we need to spark more growth. sandra: crocs ceo joining us first on stock business, a pop today, following earnings, find out what the foot ware company is doing to follow up a record setting 20 # 12. david, the shoes still sell like hot cakes. daifd -- david: they came back because of good management. we'll talk about that, but, first, what drove the markets today with the data download. a sea of red on wall street with all three ending lower the second day in a row. s&p in negative territory for the week, on track to snap the longest winning streak in more than two years. materials, financials, and technology the worst performing sectors today while telecom and consumer staples posted gains. americans applying for jobless benefits rose more than expectedded last week. initial claims jumped 20,000 to 362,000, and revised higher, and this happens often by 1,000 to 342,000. existing home sales edged higher in january as inventory dropped to the lowest level in more than 13 years. the national association of released -- of realtors had it 4.92 million, sandy?
't miss pine river's ceo brian taylor. on our radar this morning, we have earnings and the economy. the national home of home builders releases its numbers for fen. after the bell, you have dell that's going to be a focus. the company in the middle of a buyout battle. it's going to be posting quarterly results after the close. our guest hoefs host this morning is sure to have an opinion on all these stories and many others, as well. the always forthcoming ken langone will be joining us on set starting at 7:00 eastern as our guest host for two hours. squawk will be hopping behind the wheel this morning. a week ago, there was a huge controversy that erupted over the tells sla. today our own phil lebeau will be taking the vehicle to boston. we'll get to all this in just a moment. andrew has the morning's top headlines. welcome back. >> thank you, becky. let's talk about the big headlines this morning. the office depot is in talk toes merge with smaller rival office max. expected to be a stock for stokz transaction. the deal could come as early as this week. kayla tousche will be joini
of our economies, competition and so for us to all of a sudden pull up the gangplanks and worry about ourselves alone i think will bring the kind of problems that we saw before. nothing is a complete analogy, but i do think that there are some lessons learned from this. i do also believe that many americans do understand that we have a stake in what is happening in other countries. the part that i think we need to understand now is i believe in the strength of america. i think that we have a huge role to play in the world but i don't see why we have to do everything alone and so i very much agree with the approach of having partners where we can, in fact, help in other parts of the world together. that would be my shortest version of what i believe in and that i really do think while i understand the pain of people in this country i think only solution to resolving it is for us to be active internationally with others. >> rose: one question is whether that's what the rest of the world wants. many people come here and say yes, in fact, when they talk to foreign leaders, they do not wan
back when s&p closes. but how much of a drag that putting into the economy and market as well? >> at this point not so much, because it is early on. as long as the ga hangs around $4, that is where we're at in chicago land area, 3.80 in the country, the more it stays up the more of a drag it will put on there i don't know the exact correlation when you see gas prices at $4, the equities pull back. david: we'll check in with you a few minutes when the s&p futures close. >> thank you. sandra: thanks, dan. let's bring in our market panel. harry shover joining us in studio for a change and steven sachs. larry, you saw the dow finishing positive for the week but the s&p snapping a seven-week winning streak. are you in the camp that we may be in for a correction here in the stock market? >> yeah, sandra, i do believe it is well overdue we'll have a correction. the bigger story remains in place. valuations are good. the economy is trudging along. i do believe we'll see 1550 in the s&p by the end of the year but we have gone up too far and too fast and we are overdue for a correction.
a more volatile place. we recognize that since the gfc, we've seen gyrations in economies that we wouldn't have ever seen before. >> there have been challenges, but changing regulatory environments in emerging countries are not easy. and i think we understand that, and we've gotten through the worst. >> there used to only be one regulator that applied territory to the deal, now there are many. hurdles are increasing. >> are we through the worst? >> yeah. i think we are actually. i think there's quite a lot going for the sector now. i think currencies may well provide boosts for this year. commodity prices look relatively stable. yes, we'll see some volatility in iron ore, but i think coal prices should start to recover. and there's a whole raft of other commodities that are looking solid now. it's not looking like a bad outlook. i still think we'll see pretty good earnings numbers from these companies. >> so your favorite picks? >> i'm going for reo tinto. i'm backing sam walsh. he's proven expertise in holding down costs in iron ore. he will, play that across the world. he's universally
for the economy. also something i think senator blunt did not cover but i would like to, there's going to be over 100,000 very low income residents in rural america that will lose their rental assistance that enables them to stay in safe and affordable housing. these families are generally female-headed households, or they're households welledderly or disabled -- welledderly or disabled. so my first question is for you, mr. werfel, if possible. and that would be as these furloughs, etc., take effect, do you anticipate it'll happen on day one, and it just happens in every agency and every department across the board, or will out be phased in -- will it be phased in over time? >> well, there's legal requirements for notice that i think deputy secretary carter mentioned. we have, what we'll see is agencies will start doing a couple of key things. first, furloughing is something that is subject to bargaining. so work is ongoing and will intensify as we approach sequester with union representation to make sure that the manner in which the furloughs are implemented are fair and equitable and etc., so t
industries and economies, the world's largest trade mostly predictable ally and always dependable friend. but some major changes on the horizon could present new challenges for the relationship. let's begin with energy. right now nearly all of canada's oil and gas exports are to the united states. that represents about 10% of u.s. energy needs. but that's about to change. neutrally technologies have unlocked new supplies of crude oil and natural gas from previously unreachable reservoirs across the u.s.. >> after years of talking about, we are finally poised to control our own energy future to disconnect some experts predict the united states will be energy independent by the year 2035. how will that affect canada's 40 billion-dollar oil bench and what will energy independence and for u.s. foreign policy? and what does it mean for pipelines? the canadian government is anxiously awaiting a decision from the white house on the proposed keystone xl pipeline. it would carry out the oil sands nearly 2,000 miles to refineries on the u.s. gulf coast. the secretary of state john kerry who has lo
in the economy or if it's seen that the efficacy and the costs don't warrant it anymore? h i think you see the jobless claims not being so great today and listen to the chatter. david cody, a reasonable guy, sequester going to knock big red -- chunk of our revenue up, you're the fed this is one of the months don't take the foot off the pedal. >> we'd debate whether or not the minutes caused the selloff. took half an hour before the acceleration began. cover of the "washington post" is fed unlikely to pull stimulus. were the minutes to blame or not yesterday? >> i know you -- ce of. but it was very funny, one point in that great conference call, said we picked a bad day to repor report. z a >> stock down 5% prior to the fed minutes and selloff, minor detail. >> people used the negatives in the conference call to buttress the idea this is perfect, fed's gonna tight exactly a time when things get weak and gasoline prices are so high. then the refiners are going down. there's no place to hide except for general mills. name a couple stocks that were up. when i find that when everything's as bad
contributions to provide the economy to businesses in trouble. we pay off our debt to business necessary time and this prevents companies from going bankrupt. but they still need help. we need to reduce the fiscal pressure and cut the cost of employment without damaging workers and their rights. >> it's fashion week here in milan. you only have to be here to get the sense of pride that people feel about this industry. how do you get that to translate to other sectors and the political system, too? >> translator: i think we can bring back pride to our politics giving a strong sign of renewal. i was in the uk and when i said i was a lawyer from italy, from milan, all people could talk about was bunga bunga. now that has changed. i've been invited to talk about the school of economics. i see when i go abroad, when foreign officials come to milan, the city is once again a focal point and there's a willingness to discuss and trade. >> the more foishlgs and public i speak to here, the more concerned i get about the risks of forming a stable government after this weekend's election. and remember, th
sanctions been on iranian behavior. >> well they certainly affected the economy, had a huge effect on the economy and led to the devaluation of the iranian currency. but it's an excellent question because there's some talks coming up now in kazakhstan of all places in late february involving the eu, the united states and the iranians. and so this is going to be a venue in which people are going to be able to see to a certain extent how serious iran is about negotiating on limits on its nuclear program. there hasn't been negotiations for some significant period of ti. and this is an opportunity to test the iranians. i think this initial round is not going to prove much but certainly over the next six months, i think there will be an ample opportunity to see if there is an intent on the iranian part to reach some sort of compromise. >> rose: leon panetta and others have said the following. we have no information that there's been a decision on the part of the iranian government and the most influential people there to builds a nuclear weapon and a missile that will deliver it. what
to do with a rotten economy. older adults are staying in the work force longer any younger adults staying out of the work force longer because they cannot get into it. host: if you don't have a retirement, there is this option -- norman is joining us from maryland, 45 years old. how much have you saved so far for your retirement? caller: first, thanks for having an article on this subject. i have been waiting for this opportunity. i have $2,800 in my 401k plan. i am wanting your opinion for people my age. i was born in 1968. it seems we are at the tail end of the pension plans and profit- sharing and at the front end of all the financial crises in the country. people my age, it seems we were never able told the 10% we were told, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i jus
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)